Wednesday, 21 November 2018

Notes from a Travel Journal: Vancouver and Capilano Bridge


Over the summer, my parents and I spent a couple of weeks in western Canada, and we both started and ended our trip in Vancouver.  This was initially simply because that's where the flights go if you want to visit the Rockies, but I absolutely loved the city of Vancouver and all it had to offer.  Today's travel journal extract is mainly about our visit to the Capilano Bridge park, but we also spent quite a lot of time walking the city's seawall, and so I'm also sharing some of my general pictures of Vancouver itself.


We began our morning in the fantastic Purebread bakery; a spot we ended up visiting almost every day we were in the city for its fantastic baking and seemingly endless range of cakes. We picked up lunch and snacks, nattering to the cheery staff and agonising over the amazing selection which made it very harder to choose.


We walked to the waterfront and caught the free shuttle to Capilano Bridge Park. The drive took us through the middle of Stanley Park and over Lionsgate bridge, and we got great views of the areas we had walked through the day before.



Capilano turned out to be brilliant: out of the city, it was surrounded by different types of fir tree up to 300 feet tall and up to 1000 years old. The park had been done out beautifully and sensitively, using natural wood and environmentally protective processes. We began our visit with the main attraction: a super long suspension bridge spanning the canyon which bounced as we walked.



 We strolled along a walkway through the forest and clocked rainbow trout in the lake and little squirrels. We saw a falcon and an owl with their handlers, and the owl especially was beautiful and sleepy.



We had a little cake break. Or more accurately, a giant cake break: mine was a massive wedge of layered banana sponge and chocolate sponge, baked together and oozing with chocolate chips. 

Re-energised, we climbed the tree top walkway: seven suspension bridges between platforms high in the trees. It was lovely to be up near the canopy, making our way over the forest floor.


We crossed back over the canyon, wobbling along the main suspension bridge and stopped for tea. It was so relaxing to sit outside in the sunshine with music playing and the hum of people about, but there was still a feeling of freshness; a sense of being surrounded by nature. We followed up with the Cliff Walk: a bridge walkway jutting out over the canyon with great views. Capilano turned out to be such a beautiful park and we really loved exploring.


Back into Vancouver, we spent a couple of hours chilling out back at our Airbnb, and then
headed out for dinner in the sunshine, stopping by the Gastown Steam clock to hear it whistle the three quarter hour. We strolled the waterfront to the Cactus Club for dinner which was located right on the harbour with views out over the boats and seaplanes. It turned out to be a fab meal, and we split sticky spicy chicken and wontons in sweet chilli and some sweet potato (or yam!) fries. I also wolfed down some fabulous baja fish tacos, full of lightly battered cod, chunky, zingy fresh salad and spicy salsa and mayo. YUM.


I managed to top this off with a frozé: basically a frozen rosé with strawberries. Or a wine slushie, as I like to think of it. At the end of the evening, we strolled back along the seafront on the way home, enjoying the sunset over coal harbour.

Kisses xxx

P.S. This blog post is part of my November travel series; I'm spending the month documenting some of the trips I've taken this year, sharing extracts from my travel journal and my photos. My aim is to do this for each day in November as a personal challenge, to get photos and words put together and record some of my favourite experiences from the year. As the weather turns chilly, it's a lovely feeling to curl up in doors and reminisce about travels past, and plot travels for the future.

1 comment:

  1. Capilano was amazing...and I had forgotten just how tempting the Purebread display was.

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